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Social Studies Teaching

Courses will change as UOTeach/Oregon/National Content standards change.

Concentration Requirements: students must complete 68 credits with a minimum of 40 upper division credits within the major.

Courses can’t overlap between sections (i.e., section 1 & 2 or section 2 & 6, etc.).

[Note: student who enrolled before January 2013 may take any course in the revised curriculum and must take a minimum of 24 upper division credits. If you wish to see the old curriculum, click here.]

Preliminary Core

1. World History, Geography, Sociology, Psychology and Anthropology.  – Choose any 2 of the following courses.

ANTH 150, 161, 280
GEOG 201, 202, 205, 208, 209, 214
HIST 101/102/103, 104/105/106
PSY 201, 202
SOC 204, 207

2. Western & Non-Western History – Choose any 2 of following courses.
We recommend that students select one course from each of the two categories (Western and non-Western history), but this is only a recommendation and students may take both courses from the same section if they prefer.

Western history
Hist 101-03 (Western Civ)
Hist 301-03 (Modern Europe series)
Hist 319-21 (Medieval Europe series)
Hist 322 (Crusades)
Hist 332, 336, 337, 342
399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS director

Non-Western history
Hist 104-06 (World History)
Hist 325 (Africa)
Hist 345, 346, 347 (Russia – USSR)
Hist 380-82 (Latin America)
Hist 386 (India)
Hist 387 (China)
399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS director

3. U.S. History –  Choose any 3 of the following courses:
Hist 201, 202, and 203
Hist 308, 309, 351, 352, 358, 363, 388
H399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS director

4. Economics – Must take Econ 201 and 202

5. Government and Political Science – Must take 2 of the following courses.

PS 201, 203, 204, 208, 225
PS308 (US political thought)
PS347 (Political Power, Influence, and Control)
PS348 (Women and Politics)
PS386 (United States Social Movements and Political

6. Research Methods Requirement: Students who join the GSS program after Jan 1, 2016, complete one of the following courses.
GEOG 391 (W18), PS 102 (SP18), SOC 311 (pre-req SOC 204 or SOC 207) (Offered every term)

7. Specialization and Upper-Division requirements:

Students who join the GSS program after Jan 1, 2016, complete 5 of the following courses. You must take at least one course from each of the following three areas: US History, Economics, and Political Science. The remaining two courses must be taken exclusively in one area of concentration.

Prior to Jan 1, 2016, take 6 of the following courses.
You must take at least one course from each of the following three areas: US History, Economics, and Political Science. The remaining three courses must be taken exclusively in one area of concentration.

400-level courses are not listed in several areas of specialization due to the significant number of prerequisites. However, you may take 400-level courses as substitutes for 300-level courses with approval from a General Social Science adviser.

ANTH 310, 314, 315, 320, 322, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 340, 343, 344, 350, 352, 365, 411, 413, 417, 419, 420, 421, 424, 429, 434, 442, 443, 445, 447, 448, 455, 488, 493
EC 327, 330, 333, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, 390
GEOG 341, 342, 343, 441, 442, 445, 446, 461, 462, 463, 465, 470, 471
US HIST 308/309, 350/351, 352, 357, 358, 359, 388, 449, 451, 455, 456, 457, 460, 461, 463, 466/467, 468, 469, 473, 476
NonUS HIST 310, 319, 320, 321, 322, 325, 326, 327, 329, 330, 332, 336/337, 342, 345, 346, 347, 380/381/382, 386, 387, 396, 397, 412, 414, 415, 416, 417, 419, 420, 421, 425, 426, 427, 428, 434, 435, 437, 438, 439, 440, 441, 442, 443, 444, 445, 446, 480, 482, 483, 484, 487, 490, 491, 493, 497, 498
INTL 345, 399, 399, 421, 422, 423, 433, 442, 444, 445, 446, 447
PS 301, 308, 310, 311, 312, 320, 321, 324, 326, 337, 340, 342, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 352, 355, 378, 386, 388, 421, 433, 440, 445, 446, 449, 455, 463, 467, 468, 470, 475, 477, 479, 480, 484, 485, 491
PSY 304, 308, 348, 366, 380, 383, 388
SOC 301, 303, 304, 305, 310, 313, 317, 328, 330, 335, 345, 346, 347, 355, 380

It is also recommended (but not required) that students take one to three courses in Education Studies in preparation for teacher training. Recommended courses include EDST 111, and 420. Additional courses might include EDST 342, 343, 399, 451, 452, 453, 454,455, 456, 457.

Course Descriptions for Social Studies Teaching

(notation if group satisfying: Arts & Letters (AL) Social Science (SSC), Science (SC), Multicultural (IP, AC, or IC). 

Preliminary CoreThe preliminary core is comprised of 4 section following content requirements in UOTeach.  It is important to note that many of the courses below serve as prerequisites for upper-division courses in the specializations.  Thus, the choices among the preliminary core courses should be made in the context of the necessary prerequisites for the subsequent specialization decision.

  1. World History, Geography, Sociology, Psychology and Anthropology. Must take two courses from the list below.

ANTH 150 World Archaeology (SSC, IC)  Introduction to archaeology and cultural change from the earliest times to the advent of state-level societies.

ANTH 161 World Cultures (SSC, IC) A first look into the work of cultural anthropology and an introduction to the cultural diversity of the world.

ANTH 280 Introduction to Language and Culture Relationship and methodology of language and culture.

GEOG 201 World Regional Geography (SSC, IC)  Introduction to the world’s cultural regions. Study of the cultural and environmental factors that make different parts of the world distinct.

GEOG 202 Geography of Europe (SSC)  Physical and cultural processes that have shaped the rural and urban landscapes of Europe.

GEOG 205 Geography of Pacific Asia (SSC, IC)  Physical, cultural, and economic processes that have shaped the rural and urban landscapes of Pacific Asia.

GEOG 208 Geography of the United States and Canada (SSC, AC) Historical and geographical analysis of the physical and human geography of the U.S. and Canada. Topics include physical regions, settlement patterns, economic development, and urbanization.

GEOG 209 Geography of the Middle East and North Africa (SSC, IC)  Physical and cultural processes that have shaped the rural and urban landscapes of the Middle East and North Africa.

GEOG 214 Geography of Latin America (SSC, IC) Physical, cultural, and economic processes that have shaped the rural and urban character of Latin America.

HIST 101, 102, 103 Western Civilization (SSC) Historical development of the Western world; major changes in value systems, ideas, social structures, economic institutions, and forms of political life. 101: ancient and medieval societies. 102: from the Renaissance to Napoleon. 103: from Napoleon to the present.

HIST 104, 105, 106 World History (SSC, IC) Survey of world cultures and civilizations and their actions. Includes study of imperialism, economic and social relations. 104: ancient societies. 105: early modern. 106: modern.

PSY 201 Mind and Brain (SC)  Introduction to perception, memory, learning, and cognition. With laboratory.

PSY 202 Mind and Society (SSC)  Introduction to topics in clinical, personality, social, and developmental psychology. With discussion.

SOC 204 Introduction to Sociology (SSC, IP)  The sociological perspective with emphasis on fundamental concepts, theories, and methods of research.

SOC 207 Social Inequality (SSC, IP)  Overview of social inequality, cross-culturally and within the United States. Examines relationship of social inequality based on social class, race, and gender to social change, social institutions, and self-identity.


2.     European & World History
Choose any two courses from the following list. These courses cannot overlap with the courses from Section 1 (History 101-03 are in both sections). We recommend that students select one course from each of the two categories (Western and non-Western history), but this is only a recommendation and students may take both courses from the same section if they prefer.


Western History

HIST 101-03 Western Civilization (SSC) Historical development of the Western world; major changes in value systems, ideas, social structures, economic institutions, and forms of political life. 101: ancient and medieval societies. 102: from the Renaissance to Napoleon. 103: from Napoleon to the present.

HIST 301-03 Modern Europe (SSC) Political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic trends from the 18th century to the present. 301: 18th century. 302: 19th century. 303: 20th century.

HIST 319 Early Middle Ages in Europe (SSC) Emergence, from the remains of the late Roman Empire, of a uniquely medieval Christian culture in the Germanic kingdoms of northern Europe between the 4th and 9th centuries.
HIST 320 High Middle Ages in Europe (SSC) Changes that swept Europe from 1000–1225, including the rise of towns and universities, new spiritual and artistic visions, and varieties of religious and social reform.
HIST 321 Late Middle Ages in Europe (SSC) A survey of Europe, 1250–1430—the age of Dante and the Black Death—when breakthroughs alternated with disasters in the realms of politics, economics, and religion.

HIST 322 The Crusades Surveys the idea and practice of Christian holy war—not only in Palestine, but within Europe. From the first crusade in 1096 through early 13th century.

HIST 332 British History: British history from the Celts to the 21st century—economic, political, religious, and social change.

HIST 336, 337 France. 336: ancien régime, 1789–1870—French Revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848; Napoleonic Empire; monarchy, republicanism, and dictatorship; society and culture in post-Revolutionary France. 337: 1870 to present—the Paris Commune and Third Republic; the Dreyfus affair; popular front, fall of France and Resistance; Algeria, de Gaulle, the 1968 student movement.

HIST 342 German History: [Topic] Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. I: Middle Ages and Reformation (1410–1648). II: Germany in the Old Regime and Age of Revolution (1648–1848). III: Modern Germany (1848 to present).

399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS adviser.
Non-Western History

HIST 104, 105, 106 World History (SSC, IC) Survey of world cultures and civilizations and their actions. Includes study of imperialism, economic and social relations. 104: ancient societies. 105: early modern. 106: modern.

HIST 325 Precolonial Africa (SSC, IC) Survey of African history to the mid-19th century, analyzing processes of state formation, regional and long-distance trade, religion, oral tradition, and systems of slavery.

HIST 345 Early Russia (SSC, IC) Kievan Rus and Byzantium; Christianization; Mongol dominance; rise of Moscow and two Ivans, one Great, one Terrible; crisis of modernization and subsequent religious dissent.

HIST 380, 381, 382 Latin America (SSC, IC) Major economic, political, and cultural trends and continuities. 380: pre-Columbian and Iberian history, the colonial period up to 1750. 381: transition from late colonial mercantilism to political independence and national definition, 1750–1910. 382: reform and revolution in modern Latin American history, 1910 to the present.

HIST 386 India (SSC, IC) India under British rule, the rise of nationalist politics, and the subcontinent in the years since independence.

HIST 387 Early China (SSC, IC) Survey from the beginnings to the 10th century focuses on the development of Chinese thought and religion and the growth of the imperial state and bureaucracy.

399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS adviser.

3. U.S. History – three courses. 

HIST 201, 202, 203 United States (SSC) Creation and development of the United States socially, economically, politically, culturally. 201: Native America, European colonization, colonial development, origins of slavery, Revolution, early Republic. 202: Jacksonian era, expansion, commercial and industrial revolution, slavery, Civil War, Reconstruction. 203: imperialism, progressivism, modernity, the 1920s, Depression and New Deal, world wars and cold war, 1960s, and recent developments.

HIST H308, 309 History of Women in the United States I and II (SSC, IP) Survey of the diverse experiences of American women from colonial times to the present. 308: 1600 to 1870. 309: 1870 to present.

HIST 351 American Radicalism (IP) Motives, strategies, successes, and failures of radical movements and their significance for American society: Workers’ movements, socialism, communism, African American freedom struggle, nationalist movements of people of color, feminism, student activism.

HIST 352 The United States in the 1960s (IP) Exploration of a watershed era: civil rights, student activism, educational crisis, Vietnam War, gender revolution, environmentalism.

HIST 358 American Jewish History (IP) Ways people who identify themselves as Jews have reinvented their identity and created communities in the United States through the 1990s.

HIST 363 American Business History American businesses from their colonial origins to the present. Interaction between the political, social, economic, and ideological environment and the internal structure and activities of business enterprises.

HIST 388 Vietnam and the United States (IP) Vietnamese society and history: the First Indochina War, origins and escalation of United States involvement in Vietnam; de-escalation and defeat.

H399 and 400-level courses with approval from GSS director

4. Economics – Must take Econ 201 and 202.

EC 201 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics (SSC)  Examines how consumers, firms, and governments make decisions when facing scarce resources and how those decisions affect market outcomes, such as prices and output. MATH 111 recommended.

EC 202 Introduction to Economic Analysis: Macroeconomics (SSC) Examines the aggregate activity of a market economy, the problems that arise, such as inflation and unemployment, and how the government can use macroeconomic policy to address these problems. EC 201 strongly recommended.

5. Government and Political Science – Must take two of the following courses.

PS 201 United States Politics (SSC) Theoretical introduction to American institutions, political doctrines, and ideology as these affect the course of politics and public policy in the United States.

PS 203 State and Local Government (SSC) Linkage between elites and masses with attention to values, beliefs, participation, and process. Topics include mass participation, state and community elites, violence, public policy.

PS 204 Introduction to Comparative Politics (SSC) Major concepts and approaches in the study of comparative government and politics.

PS 208 Introduction to the Tradition of Political Theory (SSC) Selected issues in political theory such as political obligation, rationality, diversity, and relativism. Covers contemporary and classical theories.

PS 225 Political Ideologies (SSC) Origins, functions, and political implications of several ideologies such as liberalism, fascism, communism, feminism, environmentalism, and nationalism.

PS 308 United States Political Thought Development of United States political thought from the Revolution through the 20th century. Includes writings of Jefferson, Paine, Madison, Tocqueville.

PS 347 Political Power, Influence, and Control (SSC) Survey of the use of the concept of power in the social sciences, stressing diverse theoretical perspectives and empirical studies of political institutions.

PS 348 Women and Politics (IP) Examines the political role of women and questions of equality in the U.S. from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics may include voting, welfare, reproductive rights, and representation. Prereq: PS 201.

PS 386 United States Social Movements and Political Change (4) (SSC) Causes and consequences of American social movements. Considers theoretical perspectives. Topics may include agrarian populism, labor movement, civil rights movement, the women’s movement, and identity politics.

6. Research Methods: Must complete one methods course (beginning January 1, 2016).

GEOG 391 Social Science Inquiry and Research How social scientists approach knowledge creation, and the research design process, including developing research questions and selecting methods. Students will further develop an understanding of ethical considerations in social scientific research, as well as how to determine the quality of research design and study findings. This course will primarily draw upon theoretical content from geography.

PS 102 Thinking Like a Social Scientist This course introduces students to different modes of thinking in everyday life, and shows how “thinking like a social scientist” can sharpen our thinking for a variety of contexts. It will prepare students for further study in any social science or history (including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology) and will make clear why studying these social sciences is useful for many different careers.

SOC 311 Introduction to Social Research The development of social research; the nature of scientific inquiry and basic methods and techniques; examination of representative sociological studies from the standpoint of methodology. Prereq: SOC 204 or 207.

7. Specialization and Upper-Division requirements: Must complete 5 (beginning January 1, 2016) or 6 (prior to January 1, 2016) upper division courses.

Anthropology

ANTH 310 Exploring Other Cultures: [Topic] How anthropologists study and describe human cultures. Content varies; draws on fieldwork, famous ethnographies, specific ethnographic areas and their problems, and comparative study of selected cultures.
ANTH 314 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective (SSC, IP)  Cross-cultural exploration of women’s power in relation to political, economic, social, and cultural roles. Case studies from Africa, America, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

ANTH  315 Gender, Folklore, Inequality (SSC, IP)  Cross-cultural exploration of the expressive and artistic realm of women’s lives. Topics include life-cycle rituals, religion, healing, verbal arts, crafts, and music.

ANTH  320 Native North Americans (SSC, IP)  Interpretive approach to accomplishments, diversity, and survival of precontact, postcontact, and present-day American Indian peoples. Impact of Euro-American stereotypes on politics and identity. Prereq: ANTH 161.

ANTH  322 Anthropology of the United States (SSC, AC)  Explores the culture and the political economy of the contemporary United States, with a particular focus on race, class, and gender relations. Pre- or coreq: ANTH 161.

ANTH  326 Caribbean Societies (SSC, IC)  Explores the legacy of processes that formed Caribbean culture—migration, slavery, and trade—in religious, popular, and scholarly contexts.

ANTH  327 Anthropological Perspectives on Africa (SSC, IC)  Thematic, comparative exploration of the contours of life in contemporary Africa. Promotes a critical historical perspective on the anthropology of the continent.

ANTH  328 New Guinea (SSC, IC)  A look at the life ways of New Guinea people; focuses on personhood, gender, exchange, Christianity, and development.

ANTH  329 Immigration and Farmworkers Political Culture (SSC, IP)  Mexican farmworkers in the United States, their history and living and working conditions explored within the political culture of immigration. Introductory social science course recommended. Stephen.

ANTH  330 Hunters and Gatherers (SSC, IP)  Survey of contemporary hunter-gatherer societies. Foraging, decision-making, exchange, prestige, marriage, gender roles, parenting, history, and demography in an ecological and evolutionary perspective.

ANTH  331 Cultures of South Asia (SSC, IC)  Survey of contemporary South Asia’s religious and cultural diversity, issues of ethnic identity, gender construction, social conflict, and politics of poverty.

ANTH 340 Fundamentals of Archaeology (SC)  Methods modern archaeology uses to reconstruct the past, including background research, field methods, laboratory analyses, and interpreting data. Prereq: ANTH 150.

ANTH 343 Pacific Islands Archaeology (SSC, IC)  Archaeology and prehistoric cultural development of Pacific island peoples from earliest settlement through early Western contact. Emphasizes Southeast Asian cultural foundations and ecological adaptations. Prereq: ANTH 150.

ANTH  344 Oregon Archaeology (SSC, AC) Native American cultural history of Oregon based on archaeological evidence. Environmental and ecological factors that condition human adaptations and contemporary cultural resource protection.

ANTH  350 Olmec, Maya, and Aztec Societies Rise and fall of various ancient Mesoamerican societies such as Olmecs, Maya, Toltecs, and Aztecs, and their cultural antecedents.

ANTH  352 The Ancient Maya Introduction to the Ancient Maya, one of the most intriguing and enduring societies in Mesoamerica. Focus is origins of social complexity and inequality.

ANTH  365 Food and Culture Anthropological approach to the role of nutrients in human development (individual and group); cultural determinants and differences among populations; world food policy; applied nutritional anthropology.

ANTH  411 Politics, Ethnicity, Nationalism Explores relationship between ethnicity, politics, and nationalism from historical and anthropological perspectives; addresses the way nationalism and ethnic identity construct and reproduce each other. Prereq: junior standing.

ANTH  413 Culture and Psychology Bridges anthropology and psychology to explore the relationship between the individual and culture; includes such topics as emotion, personality, mental illness, and sexuality.

ANTH  417 Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology Techniques of participant observation, community definition and extension, nondirective interviewing, and establishing rapport. Provides theoretical perspectives and emphasizes investigator’s ethical responsibilities. Prereq: ANTH 161.

ANTH  419 Performance, Politics, and Folklore Aesthetic, political, economic, and social dimensions of cultural performances examined in museums, heritage displays, folklore festivals, community celebrations, and tourist destinations. Pre- or coreq: ANTH 161.

ANTH  420 Culture, Illness, and Healing Cultural foundations of illness and healing. Attempts to analyze illness experiences, looks at therapies cross-culturally, and examines the nature of healing. Prereq: ANTH 161

ANTH  421 Anthropology of Gender Explores gender cross-culturally. Topics include sex and sexualities; queer communities; the politics of marriage; local and global feminisms; and relations among gender, race, colonialism, and global capital. Prereq: sophomore standing.

ANTH  424 Feminist Methods in Anthropology Feminist research design and methods in three subfields of anthropology: biological, sociocultural, archaeological. Examination of case studies illustrating research ethics, collaboration, and activism. Prereq: junior standing.

ANTH  429 Jewish Folklore and Ethnology Traditional expressive culture of East European Jews; includes narrative, proverbs, jokes, folk beliefs, rituals, holidays, food, customs, music, gender, and immigrant folklore in the United States. Prereq: junior standing.

ANTH  434 Native South Americans (IC)  Contact period and contemporary ethnography of native peoples; ecological adaptation, socioeconomic organization, and culture change. Prereq: 4 credits in cultural anthropology.

ANTH  442 Northwest Coast Archaeology (AC) Archaeological and prehistoric cultural development of peoples indigenous to the Northwest Coast of North America, from Alaska to northern California, from earliest settlement through Western contact. Prereq: ANTH 150.

ANTH  443 North American Archaeology (IP)  Survey of interdisciplinary research applied to prehistoric cultures and environments in North America. Prereq: ANTH 150.

ANTH  445 Archaeology of Cultural Landscapes Archaeological and landscape concepts represented in the past and the present. Site distributional, ecological, and sociosymbolic dimensions of landscapes are examined. Prereq: ANTH 150.

ANTH  447 Traditional Technologies Explores 2.5 million years of human technologies through analysis and replication of stone, bone, shell, and wood tools as well as basketry and ceramics.

ANTH  448 Gender and Archaeology (IP)  Examines case studies from around the world to investigate how archaeological remains can illuminate gender in pre-contact societies.

ANTH  455 Historical Anthropology Surveys various approaches  Marxist, symbolic, practice theoretical, archaeological) and topics (colonialism, representation, subaltern studies, the invention of tradition) in historical anthropology. Prereq: junior standing. Offered alternate years.

ANTH  488 Foundations of Social Theory Important early social theorists (Marx, Engels, Freud, Durkheim, Weber) and the historical conditions in which the study of society emerged in Western thought.

ANTH  493 Anthropology and Popular Culture Offers insights into the conditions of the reproduction of social relations through the analysis of film, sport, television, advertising, folklore, fashion, and festivals. Prereq: junior standing.

Economics

EC 327 Introduction to Game Theory (SSC)  Introductory course in game theory. Develops game-theoretic methods of rational decision making and equilibriums, using many in-class active games. Prereq: EC 101 or 201.

EC 330 Urban and Regional Economic Problems (SSC, IP)  Topics may include urban and metropolitan growth, land use, race and poverty, education systems, slums and urban renewal, transportation, crime, and pollution and environmental quality. Prereq: EC 201.

EC 333 Resource and Environmental Economic Issues Economic analysis of replenishable and nonreplenishable natural resources; environmental issues and policies. Prereq: EC 201.

EC 340 Issues in Public Economics (SSC) Principles and problems of government financing. Expenditures, revenues, debt, and financial administration. Production by government versus production by the private sector. Tax measures to control externalities. Prereq: EC 201.

EC 350 Labor Market Issues (SSC) Topics may include the changing structure of employment, the minimum wage, the dual labor market hypothesis, collective bargaining, discrimination, and health and safety regulation. Prereq: EC 201.

EC 360 Issues in Industrial Organization (SSC)  Topics may include analysis of market power, trends in industrial structure, the role of advertising, pricing policies and inflation, impact of social regulation (e.g., OSHA, EPA), and international comparisons. Prereq: EC 201.

EC 370 Money and Banking (SSC)  Operations of commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and the Treasury that affect the United States monetary system. Prereq: EC 202.

EC 380 International Economic Issues (SSC)  Exchange across international boundaries, theory of comparative advantage, balance of payments and adjustments, international financial movements, exchange rates and international financial institutions, trade restrictions and policy. Prereq: EC 201.

EC 390 Problems and Issues in the Developing Economies (SSC, IC)  Topics may include the role of central planning, capital formation, population growth, agriculture, health and education, interaction between economic and cultural change, and the “North-South debate.” Prereq: EC 201.

Geography

GEOG 341 Population and Environment (SSC, IC)  Patterns of population growth over history and place, current policies and programs, and impacts and trends in U.S. and international contexts. Includes method and theory.

GEOG 342 Geography of Globalization (SSC)  Historical and geographical dimensions of globalization; emphasizes economic and social factors. Topics include multinationals, trade agreements, sustainability, global inequalities, and racial and gender divisions of labor. Prereq: sophomore standing.

GEOG 343 Society, Culture, and Place (SSC, IP) Examines ways in which geographical context reflects and shapes cultural and social processes. Importance of place and territory in human affairs. Prereq: sophomore standing.

GEOG 441 Political Geography (IP)  Spatial perspectives on global political patterns and processes. Relationship of political territories to resources, ethnic patterns, and ideological communities. Impact of political arrangements on landscapes. Prereq: junior standing.

GEOG 442 Urban Geography Urbanization throughout the world, the structure of urban settlements; cities as regional centers, physical places, and homes for people; geographic problems in major urban environments. Special fee. Prereq: junior standing.

GEOG 445 Culture, Ethnicity, and Nationalism (IP)  Relationship of ethnic groups and nationality to landscapes, perception, and cultural geographic phenomena. Distribution of ethnic and national groups. Prereq: junior standing.

GEOG 446 Geography of Religion Origin and diffusion of religions; religion, worldview, environmental perception and alteration; religion, territory, the organization of space. Prereq: junior standing.

GEOG 461 Environmental Alteration Human alterations of the earth’s major ecosystems. Consequences of human activity at different times and places with respect to soils, atmosphere, vegetation, landforms, and water. Prereq: junior standing. Not offered 2009–10.

GEOG 462 Historical and Contemporary Views of the Environment Ways in which humans have thought about their place in nature. Environmental ideas that emphasize concepts of ecology. Prereq: junior standing.  Not offered 2009–10.

GEOG 463 Geography, Law, and the Environment Values underlying American legal approaches to environmental issues; the role of laws in reflecting and shaping human understanding and use of the environment. Special fee. Prereq: junior standing.  Not offered 2009–10.

GEOG 465 Environment and Development (IC) Critical analysis of development concepts. Economic activity and environmental impacts. Sustainable development. Development projects and landscapes in the industrializing world. Prereq: junior standing.

GEOG 470 Advanced Geography of European-American Regions: [Topic] Examination of the settlement patterns, regional economies, political organization, and character of the landscapes of selected major regions of the European-American world. Prereq: junior standing. R when region changes.  Not offered 2009–10.

GEOG 471 North American Historical Landscapes (AC)  Examines the origin and evolution of cultural landscapes in North America through historical and contemporary sources, and draws upon the local region for student projects. Prereq: junior standing.

History

US History

HIST 308, 309 History of Women in the United States I,II (SSC, IP) Survey of the diverse experiences of American women from colonial times to the present. 308: 1600 to 1870. 309: 1870 to present.

HIST 350, 351 American Radicalism (IP)  Motives, strategies, successes, and failures of radical movements and their significance for American society. 350: American Revolution, slave revolts, abolitionism, women’s rights. 351: workers’ movements, socialism, communism, African American freedom struggle, nationalist movements of people of color, feminism, student activism.

HIST 352 The United States in the 1960s (SSC)  Exploration of a watershed era: civil rights, student activism, educational crisis, Vietnam War, gender revolution, environmentalism.

HIST 357 The South Regional history of the South and of successive Southern ways of life. Evolution of the South as a slaveholding society, its bid for independence, and its subsequent redefinitions and adaptations to national norms.

HIST 358 American Jewish History (IP)  Ways people who identify themselves as Jews have reinvented their identity and created communities in the United States through the 1990s.

HIST 359 Religious Life in the United States Planting, adaptation, development, and social role of religious groups and traditions in the United States from the colonial period to the present.

HIST 388 Vietnam and the United States (IP)  Vietnamese society and history: the First Indochina War, origins and escalation of United States involvement in Vietnam; de-escalation and defeat.

HIST 449 Race and Ethnicity in the American West (AC)  Explores the growth of communities of color in western cities of the United States, with particular reference to competition and cooperation between groups.

HIST 451 American Foreign Relations: [Topic] Chronological and thematic topics in American foreign relations. R when topic changes.

HIST 455 Colonial American History (AC)  Native Americans; motives, methods, implications of European colonization; origins of American slavery; interaction of diverse peoples in shaping colonial North American societies, economies, landscapes, politics.

HIST 456 Revolutionary America Origins, consequences, meanings of American Revolution; changing social, economic, and political contexts; intellectual, religious, and ideological trends; Constitution; institutional, social, and cultural legacy.

HIST 457 19th-Century United States: [Topic] Political, social, economic, and cultural history. I: Jacksonian Era. II: Civil War. III: Reconstruction. IV: Gilded Age. R thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

HIST 460 American Intellectual History: [Topic] Leading thinkers and prevalent modes of thought in American life from European settlement of North America to the present. I: To 1800, II: 19th Century, III: 20th Century. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 461 American Medical History Explores the social history of medicine and health in the United States.

HIST 463 American Economic History: [Topic] Varying topics on the economic development of the United States as a preindustrial, industrial, and postindustrial society. I: The Great Depression. II: Industrialization. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 466, 467 The American West Social, political, and cultural history. 466/566: peoples of the American West and the expansion of the United States in the 19th century. 467/567: 20th-century immigration, urban growth, economic development; social and political institutions; politics of race, ethnicity, and gender in a multicultural region

HIST 468 The Pacific Northwest Regional history to the mid-20th century. How the Pacific Northwest mirrors the national experience and how the region has a distinctive history and culture

HIST 469 American Indian History: [Topic] (IP)  Variable chronological, thematic, and regional topics, including Indian history to 1860; 1860 to the present; Indians and colonialism; Indians and environments; Indians and gender; regional histories. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 473 American Environmental History: [Topic]  Variable topics examine the social, cultural, economic, and political history of the American landscape; how Americans have understood, transformed, degraded, conserved, and preserved their environments. I: To 1800. II: 19th Century. III: 20th-Century Environment and Environmentalism. IV: Environment and the West. R thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

HIST 476 United States in the 20th Century: [Topic] Political, social, economic, and cultural history. I: Progressive Era. II: Depression and World War II. III: Since 1950. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Non-US-History

HIST 310 Early Modern Women The ways in which perceptions about women’s and gender roles in society partially reflected and partially contrasted with their actual role.

HIST 319 Early Middle Ages in Europe (SSC)  Emergence, from the remains of the late Roman Empire, of a uniquely medieval Christian culture in the Germanic kingdoms of northern Europe between the 4th and 9th centuries.

HIST 320 High Middle Ages in Europe (SSC)  Changes that swept Europe from 1000–1225, including the rise of towns and universities, new spiritual and artistic visions, and varieties of religious and social reform.

HIST 321 Late Middle Ages in Europe (SSC)  A survey of Europe, 1250–1430—the age of Dante and the Black Death—when breakthroughs alternated with disasters in the realms of politics, economics, and religion.

HIST 322 The Crusades Surveys the idea and practice of Christian holy war—not only in Palestine, but within Europe. From the first crusade in 1096 through early 13th century.

HIST 325 Precolonial Africa (SSC, IC)  Survey of African history to the mid-19th century, analyzing processes of state formation, regional and long-distance trade, religion, oral tradition, and systems of slavery.

HIST 326 Colonial and Postcolonial Africa (SSC, IC)  Survey of African history from the 1880s to the 1960s. Emphasis on the internal dynamics of change as well as the impact of colonialism.

HIST 327 The Age of Discoveries European exploration and seaborne empires, 1270–1600. Motives, technology, and institutions of the Italian and Iberian empires. Medieval travels to Asia; Venetian and Genoese empires; Spanish conquest of Mexico. HIST 101, 102 or equivalents recommended.

HIST 329 Mediterranean World, Antiquity to 1453 Late antiquity, Byzantium, rise of Islam, Abbasid caliphate, conquests of Spain and Sicily, religious tolerance, the roles of women, trade, and intellectual exchange.

HIST 330 Mediterranean World, 1453–1700 The rise of the Ottomans, Venetian trade, Jewish diaspora from Spain, the roles of women, piracy, slavery, and the decline of the Mediterranean.

HIST 332 British History: [Topic] British history from the Celts to the 21st century—economic, political, religious, and social change. R twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 336, 337 France (4,4) 336: ancien régime, 1789–1870—French Revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848; Napoleonic Empire; monarchy, republicanism, and dictatorship; society and culture in post-Revolutionary France. 337: 1870 to present—the Paris Commune and Third Republic; the Dreyfus affair; popular front, fall of France and Resistance; Algeria, de Gaulle, the 1968 student movement.

HIST 342 German History: [Topic] Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. I: Middle Ages and Reformation (1410–1648). II: Germany in the Old Regime and Age of Revolution (1648–1848). III: Modern Germany (1848–present). R twice for a maximum of 12 credits when topic changes.

HIST 345 Early Russia (SSC, IC)  Kievan Rus and Byzantium; Christianization; Mongol dominance; rise of Moscow and two Ivans, one Great, one Terrible; crisis of modernization and subsequent religious dissent.

HIST 346 Imperial Russia (SSC, IC) Siberian and North American expansion; Peter the Great; Catherine the Great; abolition of serfdom; industrialization; Silver Age culture and revolution; World War I and collapse.

HIST 347 Soviet Union and Contemporary Russia (SSC, IC)  Examines the rise, development, and collapse of the Soviet Union, the world’s first communist regime. Topics include the Russian Revolution, Stalinism, war, culture, and society.

HIST 380, 381, 382 Latin America (4,4,4) (SSC, IC) Major economic, political, and cultural trends and continuities. 380: pre-Columbian and Iberian history, the colonial period up to 1750. 381: transition from late colonial mercantilism to political independence and national definition, 1750–1910. 382: reform and revolution in modern Latin American history, 1910 to the present. Sophomore standing recommended.  .

HIST 386 India (IP) India under British rule, the rise of nationalist politics, and the subcontinent in the years since independence.

HIST 387 Early China (SSC, IC)  Survey from the beginnings to the 10th century focuses on the development of Chinese thought and religion and the growth of the imperial state and bureaucracy.

HIST 396 Samurai in Film (SSC, IC)  Examination of the image of Japan’s warrior class, the most prominent social group in Japan for over seven centuries. Combines films, readings, and lectures.

HIST 397 Modern Chinese History Provides an overview of modern China, guiding students through the richness and complexity of modern Chinese history. Conducted in Mandarin Chinese. Prereq: proficiency in Mandarin as determined by instructor.

HIST 412 Ancient Greece: [Topic] Political, cultural, and intellectual history of ancient Greece; emphasis on urban culture. I: Classical Greece. II: Hellenistic World. III: Greek Science. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 414 Ancient Rome: [Topic] (IP)  Political, social, cultural, and intellectual history of ancient Rome from its foundation to late antiquity; emphasis on urban culture. I: Roman Republic. II: Roman Empire. III: Roman Society. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 415 Advanced World History: [Topic] (IC)  Advanced intensive study of selected issues in world history. Possible topics include biology and ecology, ancient empires, or intercultural encounters. R when topic changes.

HIST 416 African Women’s History: [Topic] (IC)  Explores African women’s changing social, economic, and political situations. I: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Motherhood. II: Gender, Nationalism, and Revolution. III: Women and Islam. R when topic changes.

HIST 417 Society and Culture in Modern Africa: [Topic] (IC)  Explorations in various topics with attention to class, gender, and generational and political struggles. I: Postcolonial African Film and Politics. II: Colonial Urban Africa. Prereq: HIST 325 or 326, depending on topic. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 419 African Regional Histories: [Topic] Examines the historiography of specific nations or regions; Swahili coast; Tanzania (formerly Tanganyika); urban South Africa, 1870s to 1970s; West African slavery. R twice for a maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 420 The Idea of Europe (IC)  The concept and experience of “Europe” explored creatively throughout history from multiple disciplinary perspectives.

HIST 421 Organization of Knowledge Production and preservation of knowledge since ancient times, first libraries, monasteries, and universities; science exploration; books and letters; the academic disciplines; the Internet.

HIST 425 Economic History of Modern Europe: [Topic] Industrial revolution, economic transformation, growth, and integration in political and social contexts. Focuses on Britain, France, Germany, and Russia. I: European Economies to 1914. II: European Economies in the 20th Century. R once when topic changes for maximum of 8 credits.

HIST 426 Cultural History of the Enlightenment Developments in science, education, economics, sex, government, art, music, communication, and travel in the 18th-century European Age of Reason.

HIST 427 Intellectual History of Modern Europe: [Topic] Major thinkers and movements include classical liberalism, utopian socialism, political economy, Marxism, aestheticism, Nietzsche, classical sociology, psychoanalysis, radical conservatism, Keynesian economics, intellectuals and political engagement, and Western Marxism. I: German Intellectual History. II: Ideas and Society, 19th Century. III: Ideas and Society, 20th Century. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 428 Europe in the 20th Century: [Topic] War, revolution, social change, political transformation, and related intellectual and cultural developments in Europe from the Great War of 1914–18 through the present. I: European Fascism. II: Jews in Modern Europe. III: Eastern Europe since World War I. IV: Europe since 1945. R when chronological or thematic topic changes.

HIST 434 Modern British History: [Topic] Selected topics in modern British history from 1700 to the present. Emphasis varies. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 435 Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe The French Revolution; Napoleon; German idealism; British industry; the coalescence of European identity; revolutions in knowledge and education; changing gender roles; imperialism.

HIST 437 Medieval Spain A study of two related aspects of medieval Iberian history: Spain as a frontier society and Spain as a multicultural, multireligious society.

HIST 438 Golden Age Spain Spanish history during one of the most important eras of its past, when it was a cultural leader in Europe and a major world power.

HIST 439 Renaissance Europe: [Topic] Cultural and intellectual history, 1200 to 1600. New religious movements, social and political change in cultural context, theology and philosophy, humanism, the rise of vernacular literatures. R once when topic changes for maximum of 8 credits.

HIST 440 The Book in History: [Topic] The book as cultural artifact, commercial commodity, and primary vehicle for the spread of ideas. I: Authorship and Publishing History. II: Reading and Censorship. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 441 16th-Century European Reformations History of religious, personal, and institutional reforms. Includes late medieval reform movements and the ideas of Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Ignatius Loyola, and Teresa of Avila.

HIST 442 Early Modern German History: [Topic] Topics include peasant society, the foundations of absolutism, the German Enlightenment, protoindustrialization. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 443 Modern Germany: [Topic] Topics include class formation, revolutionary movements, the socialist tradition, the Third Reich. R when topic changes.

HIST 444 The Holocaust Surveys history of Nazi genocide, focusing on terror and complicity in formation of racial policy, and perceptions of Nazi anti-Semitism as the Holocaust was occurring.

HIST 445 Tsarist and Imperial Russia: [Topic] Creation of a great Eurasian civilization. Geopolitical expansion, Siberia, imperialism, origins of autocracy, serfdom, church and state, political opposition, rise of civil society, industrialization. R twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 446 Modern Russia: [Topic] (IC)  Explores topics such as the intellectual and cultural history of Russia from the revolution to recent times. R twice for a maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 480 Mexico (IC) Mexican history from pre-Hispanic times to the present. Special attention to nationhood, economic development, church-state relations, the Mexican identity, and the Revolution of 1910.

HIST 482 Latin America’s Indian Peoples (IC)  Impact of Iberian conquest and settlement on the lives of the indigenous peoples of the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America, and South America.

HIST 483 Latin America: [Topic] (IC) Variable topics include the experience of blacks and Indians; the struggle for land, reform, and revolution. R thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

HIST 484 Philippines (IC)  Philippine history from pre-Hispanic times to the present with particular emphasis on the past hundred years.

HIST 487 China: [Topic] (IC)  Survey from the 10th century. Foundations and transformations of state and society; popular rebellions; impact of imperialism; issues of modernity; state building; political, cultural, and social revolutions. I: Song and Yuan. II: Ming and Qing. III: Late Qing. IV: Republican China. V: China since 1949. R thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

HIST 490 Japan: [Topic] (IC)  Political, social, and cultural history from ancient through contemporary. Origins, aristocratic society, medieval age, Zen, warrior class, urban growth, modernization, imperialism, Pacific war, postwar society. I: To 1333. II: Medieval, 1333–1800. III: Modern Age. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 491 Medicine and Society in Premodern Japan (IC)  Japanese medical tradition: folk, Buddhist, Chinese, Dutch. Diseases, treatment and medical services, medical knowledge, acupuncture, sexual hygiene, anatomy, sexually transmitted diseases, reproduction, and family.

HIST 493 Japanese History through Film: [Topic] Examination of issues of personal identity and choice in selected periods of Japanese history, with emphasis on individual and group responses to transition and social change. R when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

HIST 497 Culture, Modernity, and Revolution in China: [Topic] (IC)  I: Modernity and Gender. II: Cultural Revolution and Memory. III: Historiography of the Communist Revolution. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

HIST 498 Early Japanese Culture and Society: [Topic] (IC)  Aspects of social history through 1800—social change, hierarchy and power, interrelationship of society and religion, medieval transformations, warrior class. I: Buddhism and Society in Medieval Japan. II: Samurai and War. III: Medieval Japan. Courses on Japanese or medieval history recommended. R twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

International Studies

INTL 345 Africa Today: Issues and Concerns (IC)  Introduces students to current challenges facing African peoples today. Extends survey of Africa courses, and prepares students for more advanced study regarding the African continent.

INTL 399 Islam and Global Forces

INTL 399 International Human Rights

INTL 421 Gender and International Development (IP)  Analysis of the changing roles, opportunities, and expectations of third-world women as their societies undergo social upheavals associated with the problematic effects of development.

INTL 422 Aid to Developing Countries Examines the history and current dynamics of international bilateral and multilateral development assistance, the possibilities and constraints of aid, and other related issues.

INTL 423 Development and the Muslim World (IC) Introduction to discourse on current development in various Muslim societies. Focuses on North Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.

INTL 433 Childhood in Cross-Cultural Perspective (IP)  Explores the experience of childhood around the world and examines how this experience is shaped by beliefs about who and what children are and by local conditions and contingencies.

INTL 442 South Asia: Development and Social Change (IC) Introduction to the vast social changes and development issues confronting the South Asian subcontinent.

INTL 444 Development and Social Change in Southeast Asia (IC)  Introduction to the region and to the complex social issues facing the peoples of Southeast Asia.

INTL 445 Development and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa (IC)  Introduces theoretical and practical aspects of development and social change in sub-Saharan Africa, with focus on key issues in African development during the postcolonial era.

INTL 446 Development and Social Change in Latin America Explores development challenges, debt cycles, urban growth, neoliberalism, populism, socialism, gender, the environment, U.S.–Latin American relations, ecotourism, and drug geographies in the region.

INTL 447 Comparative Tribalisms (IP)  Situates contemporary polemics in Africa and the U.S. regarding ethnic, racial, and religious violence, culture wars, and nationalism in a comparative analytic framework.

Political Science

PS 301 Art and the State (SSC)  Comparative analysis of issues raised by state intervention in production and distribution of art: censorship, artistic freedom, ideological domination, regulation of artistic marketplace, cultural imperialism.

PS 308 United States Political Thought Development of United States political thought from the Revolution through the 20th century. Includes writings of Jefferson, Paine, Madison, Tocqueville.

PS 310 Roots of Democracy (SSC) Examines modern conceptions of democracy, citizenship, legality, virtue, equality, and political order, which grew out of ideas initially developed in ancient Greek city-states. Special attention given to ideas of active citizenship.

PS 311 Soverignity and Revolution (SSC) Examines contemporary conceptions of politics springing from European debates about the power of kings, law, and the people. Considers key textual moments in the process by which modern conceptions of democracy emerged.

PS 312 Shadows of Modernity (SSC) Explores the distinct critiques of modernity offered by John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Michel Foucault, and Sigmund Freud. Concepts explored include liberalism, capitalism, power, morality, and the unconscious.

PS 320 International Organization Studies efforts by states to cooperate in an effort to avoid or resolve conflict in the realms of security, trade, human rights, and the environment.

PS 321 Introduction to Poiclitical Economy (SSC)  Systematic comparison of markets and political processes and their outcomes.

PS 324 European Politics (SSC, IP)  Overview of the formation and current dynamics of national politics in Western Europe.

PS 326 United States Foreign Policy I (SSC) Basic concepts underlying the formulation and implementation of United States foreign policy; relationships between American society and foreign policy; the relationship of the U.S. to its international environment.

PS 337 The Politics of Development (SSC, IC)  Presents alternative perspectives on key north-south issues: trade, aid, foreign investment, debt, and the environment. Includes such institutions as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and World Trade Organization.

PS 340 International Political Economy Links between economics and politics in the international system. Basic concepts include power, dependence, inequality, imperialism, and development. EC 201, 202 recommended.

PS 342 Politics of China (IC)  Survey of the politics of the People’s Republic of China. Emphasis on political sociology and group conflict: elites, ideology, social change, and organization.

PS 346 Terrorism and Weapons Proliferation Examines causes and control of terrorism, especially preventing terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction; theories and policies of nonproliferation and arms control.

PS 347 Political Power, Influence, and Control (SSC) Survey of the use of the concept of power in the social sciences, stressing diverse theoretical perspectives and empirical studies of political institutions.

PS 348 Women and Politics (IP)  Examines the treatment of women in the classic works of political philosophy. Links this body of thought to contemporary views on women.

PS 349 Mass Media and American Politics (SSC)  The role of the mass media in contemporary American politics; the effect of the media on such institutions as political parties, elections, and the presidency.

PS 350 Politics and Film Examines the political relevance of films and their role as a medium for illustrating, defending, and challenging political ideas. Prereq: one from PS 201, 203, 260.

PS 352 Political Parties and Interest Groups (SSC) Overview of current developments in political parties and interest groups in the United States.

PS 355 Oregon Government and Politics Current political issues in Oregon with particular attention to political races and ballot measures before the Oregon electorate as well as the state’s major political institutions.

PS 378 Games in Politics Politics viewed as strategic interactions among politicians, voters, and countries; focuses on how to model these interactions using tools of game theory.

PS 386 United States Social Movements and Political Change (SSC, IP) Causes and consequences of American social movements. Considers theoretical perspectives. Topics may include agrarian populism, labor movement, civil rights movement, the women’s movement, and identity politics.

PS 388 Mafia and Corruption in Russia (IC)  Focuses on the Mafia, corruption, and organized crime as integral parts of Russia’s transition to democracy, and their relationships with the state.

PS 421 Science, Technology, and International Relations Examines weapons development, economic competitiveness, and environmental issues to learn how advances in science and technology have influenced international relations.

PS 433 Marxism and Radical Thought Surveys utopian socialist thought, anarchism, Marxism, and Leninism. Central themes include the nature of radical theory, the role of the state, human nature and the new society.

PS 440 Causes and Prevention of War Surveys theories of causes of war; focuses on major theories of prevention; case studies from World War I, World War II, and other wars.

PS 445 Methods for Politics and Policy Analysis I Introduction to quantitative analysis, concepts and methods of empirical research, applied statistical data analysis in political science. Methods include descriptive statistics, bivariate correlation, and regression techniques.

PS 446 Methods for Politics and Policy Analysis II (4) Survey of multivariate model building for political analysis. Multiple regression, discrete-variable techniques, recursive systems, and cross-level analysis. Application of these techniques to concrete political problems. Prereq: PS 445/545.

PS 449 Racial Politics in the United States I,II (4,4) (AC) Considers how race has interacted with political development in the U.S. 448: colonial period through the New Deal. 449: New Deal to the present.

PS 455 Theories of International Politics Competing theories of international relations and strategies for testing the theories. Prereq: PS 205 or 326.

PS 463 Government and Politics of Latin America (IC) Historical impact of international economic integration on democracy, equity, and sustainability; Cuban revolution; national security states; new social movements; case studies: Chile, Brazil, Mexico.

PS 467 The United States Presidency An ambivalent view of the presidency as the key institution in the United States political system: source of great good but also of great harm.

PS 468 Congress Study of Congress as an institution: congressional elections, the committee system, and the internal distribution of influence; relations with the President and the Supreme Court

PS 470 Constitutional Law Surveys how the U.S. Constitution works as a structure for government. Addresses how the federal courts interact within the U.S. system of government.

PS 475 Politics of the European Union Surveys the historical development and current workings of the European Union’s major institutions and policies. Offered alternate years.

PS 477 International Environmental Politics (4) How nations solve international environmental problems. Explores major problems, processes, and current debates. Evaluates existing treaties through case studies. Prereq: ENVS 201 or PS 205.

PS 479 U.S. Interventions in Developing Nations Examines theories of intervention: security, economic imperialism, humanitarian intervention, spreading democracy, domestic politics; over thirty-seven U.S. interventions since 1898 are surveyed.

PS 480 Introduction to Rational Choice Introduces the paradigm of rational choice and game theory that is of special significance to politics.

PS 484 United States Supreme Court The Supreme Court as a political body; the judicial role in the context of the economic, political, social, and psychological factors that influence the court’s decisions.

PS 485 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (4) Overview of the role of rights in the United States legal system. Particular emphasis on the role of freedom and equality in a federal system. Prereq: one from PS 201, 260, 275.

PS 491 Politics of Everyday Life Examines how we try to influence each other’s behaviors in the course of everyday life. Readings from several disciplines.

 

Psychology

PSY 304 Biopsychology (SC)  Relationships between brain and endocrine activity and behavior. Topics include sensation, perception, sexual behavior, drug effects, eating, drinking, sleeping, dreaming, and learning.

PSY 308 Developmental Psychology (SSC) Survey of cognitive, social-emotional, and personality development in infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood.  Prereq: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

PSY 348 Music and the Brain (SC)  Explores the neural correlates of our perception of tonality, harmony, melody, and rhythm and how these relate to neurobiology, brain damage, and cognitive neuroscience.

PSY 366 Culture and Mental Health (SSC, IP)  Role of culture in the definition and maintenance of mental health and the definition and treatment of mental illness.

PSY 380 Psychology of Gender (SSC, IP) Critical analysis of evidence for sex differences, gender roles, and the effect of gender on traditional issues in psychology. Topics include parenthood, violence, and sexual orientation.

PSY 383 Psychoactive Drugs Physiological and behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs such as alcohol, opiates, barbiturates, and excitants. The psychology of use and overuse; therapies for correcting drug problems.

PSY 388 Human Sexuality The nature of human sexuality; hormonal, instinctual, and learned factors in sexuality; psychosexual development; sexual orientation; frequency and significance of various types of sexual behavior; sexual inadequacy; sexual deviation.

Sociology

SOC 301 American Society Selected aspects of American culture and institutions and the ways in which they are changing. Recommended: SOC 204

SOC 303 World Population and Social Structure Introduction to population studies. Comparative analysis of historical, contemporary, and anticipated demographic change. Emphasis on demographic transitions between and within developed and underdeveloped countries.

SOC 304 Community, Environment, and Society (SSC)  Interrelationship of social and environmental factors in human communities, processes of community change, impact of environmental change on human communities.

SOC 305 America’s Peoples (SSC, AC) Examines how the size, composition, and distribution of America’s ethnic and racial subpopulations have shaped social structure, social culture, and social change in the United States. Prereq: SOC 204 or 207.

SOC 310 Development of Sociology  Analysis of the major writers and ideas that have shaped contemporary sociology. Focus on recurrent concepts and issues that continue to challenge sociological inquiry.

SOC 313 Social Issues and Movements (SSC)  Contemporary social issues viewed in relation to the social structure of American society. Social movements and ideologies related to these issues.

SOC 317 Sociology of the Mass Media (SSC)  Analysis of media events: advertisements, news broadcasts, documentaries, popular music, and television. Perspectives include content analysis, semiotics, functionalist and structuralist paradigms, and power system analysis.

SOC 328 Introduction to Social Psychology (SSC) How the thought, feeling, and behavior of individuals are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others.

SOC 330 Sociology of the Family Introduction to and historical perspective of the family as a social institution and small-group association. Prereq: SOC 204 or 207.

SOC 335 Interaction and Social Order Introduction to ethnomethodology, which is the study of methods by which humans order their activities, and conversation analysis, which focuses on methods organizing talk-in-interaction. Prereq: SOC 204 or 207.

SOC 345 Race, Class, and Ethnic Groups (SSC, AC)  Major class, racial, and ethnic groups in the United States with special attention to the culture and experience of minority groups.

SOC 346 Work and Occupations (SSC)  Characteristics of work and occupational careers in modern societies; relationships of those to family, the economy, bureaucracy, technology, and alienation.

SOC 347 Complex Organizations Nature of organizations in modern societies (e.g., specialization, impersonality, formalization, authority, and power); relationship of organizations to work and careers, stratification, democracy, discrimination, and deviance.

SOC 355 Sociology of Women (SSC, IP)  Position of women in contemporary society; women and work, politics, families, the economy; intersection of gender, race, and class; women’s movements.

SOC 380 Introduction: Deviance, Control, and Crime Origins of rules and laws, patterns of reactions to their violation, emphasis on causal theories of deviance and of crime, data sources for study of crime.

It is also recommended that students take one to three courses in Education Studies in preparation for teacher training.  Recommended courses include EDST 111 and 420.  In addition, EDST 342, 343, 399, 451, 452, 453, 454,455, 456, 457 would also provide valuable preparation.

EDST 111 Educational Issues and Problems (SSC)

EDST 342 Curriculum Studies I

EDST 343 Curriculum Studies II

EDST 399 Teaching by Teachers

EDST 420 Living in Stratified Society

EDST 451 Equal Opportunity: Ecojustice Education

EDST 452 Equal Opportunity: Poverty

EDST 453 Equal Opportunity: Racism

EDST 454 Equal Opportunity: Patriarchy

EDST 455 Equal Opportunity: Homophobia

EDST 456 Equal Opportunity: Colonization and Genocide

EDST 457 Equal Opportunity: Diaspora and Immigration



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